Irregular sleep could negatively impact heart health



It’s not just lack of sleep and poor sleep that can put the heart at risk — getting to bed on time may also matter, new research suggests.

The recent study took the unique approach of looking at how much night-to-night difference a person had in sleep duration and what time he or she fell asleep. People with irregular sleep patterns had a higher risk for a cardiovascular event, including stroke, congestive heart failure and coronary heart disease, the study found.

“Sleep regularity is an understudied area with critical relevance to everyone. Understanding its relationship with cardiovascular disease has important public health implications and may identify novel strategies for cardiovascular disease prevention,” said Tianyi Huang, lead author of the study presented at the recent American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions in Houston.

Researchers looked at data from nearly 2,000 people without cardiovascular disease at the start of the study. Participants wore sleep-monitoring wrist devices for seven-day periods from 2010 to 2013 and were followed for an average of four years. During that time, 95 people experienced or died from a stroke, heart failure or heart disease.

After adjusting for various factors, researchers found that people whose night-to-night sleep length during a seven-day period varied by more than two hours on average were 2.2 times more likely to have a cardiovascular event than people whose sleep length varied by an hour or less.

The time they fell asleep each night had a similar impact. Compared to people who went to bed within the same 30-minute window each night, those with a bedtime that varied by more than 90 minutes had double the risk of a cardiovascular event.

“If our results are confirmed, the general public — particularly those at high risk for cardiovascular disease — needs to pay more attention to their sleep schedules,” he said. “People should be encouraged to reduce use of mobile devices or TV viewing before sleep to improve sleep regularity and maximize cardiometabolic benefits.”

Huang said the study is the first of its kind and called for larger studies with longer follow-ups, especially those that explore gender and age differences. He said studies are needed that focus on how irregular sleep is related to specific cardiovascular outcomes.

Another issue is that big changes in sleep timing can lead to a state of jetlag — referred to as “social jetlag” — without people even realizing it.

“People might not have outward signs — they might not even feel sleepy or yawn, just like people don’t feel it if they have high blood pressure or high cholesterol levels. But the risk factor is still there,” she said. “People need to pay more attention and be more aware of the adverse impact poor sleep is having.”

For the full news story visit American Heart Association News.

Edit ModuleShow Tags


 

AHA AD: Symptoms. Always feeling tired isn't normal. Learn the signs of Heart Valve Disease.


 


 


 

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Special Topic Supplements

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Departments

Heart News

Heart health news you can use about new scientific findings, public policy, programs and resources.

Heartfelt

Articles, poems and art submitted by heart disease survivors and their loved ones.

Life's Simple 7

Improving your health is as easy as minding seven simple health factors and behaviors. Tips and information to help you improve your health and enhance your quality of life.

Life Is Why

Everyone has a reason to live a longer, healthier life. These heart patients, their loved ones and others share their 'whys'. We'd love for you to share yours, too!

Simple Cooking

Cooking at home can be a daunting task, but a rewarding one for your diet and lifestyle (and your wallet). Making small changes in your diet is important to your heart health. Here are simple, healthy and affordable recipes and cooking tips.